Pike confronts his destiny

I’m finding the serial nature of Discovery — particularly the past few weeks where the episodes are more chapter-like with incremental arc progress than they are episodic standalones — is starting to make the reviewing process somewhat more tedious as we reach the end of the season. There are only so many ways I can say I was moderately entertained by an hour of sci-fi action-adventure while shrugging at the big picture because it’s deferred for yet another week.

But that’s the MO of this series. Advance the plot in mechanically incremental but not especially substantively groundbreaking ways (because we still have two episodes after this one). Deliver some decent dialogue scenes. Reveal a somewhat significant character insight. Have a major action set-piece. End on a cliffhanger that teases us for next week. This, as I say nearly every time, is adequately diverting. But it’s becoming considerably less interesting to write about as the season goes on. I’ve reached the point where I want to know what the destination is. The journey documenting Control’s desire to take over the galaxy has probably gone on long enough — and an evil AI devoid of any plausible motivation for its plan to wipe out all life is not particularly compelling as villains go.

Read the full review…

Infinite timelines in infinite combinations

"Perpetual Infinity" is another frequently exciting episode of Action Thriller Trek that moves the season arc forward and is mostly sold on its sense of adrenaline, which continues to deliver admirably. But it also comes at a moment in the season when the arc begins supplying answers and tying together threads, and the big picture begins coming into focus. And I’m wondering how much of this is going to make sense by the end. The truth is, it probably doesn’t have to make very much sense because manipulating timelines means probably anything is possible.

There are some points here I’m confused about. I’d watch it again to clarify details, but I don’t have time in my schedule for that, and I don’t own a time-traveling suit to make more time. (Besides, I have doubts that a rewatch would necessarily clear things up.)

Read the full review…

Struggle is pointless

Control.

Control. Control Control Control. Control, Control Control Control Control Control. Control Control Control Control Control; Control Control Control Control Control, Control Control. Control.

Control!

Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control. Control Control Control Control Control Control Control, Control Control Control Control Control, Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control. Control Control Control Control — Control Control Control Control Control Control — Control Control Control Control Control Control.

Control Control Control, Control Control Control Control Control Control Control. Control, Control Control Control Control. Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control — Control Control Control Control Control.

Control Control Control Control Control Control. Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control Control. Control Control Control Control, Control Control Control Control Control Control Control. Control Control Control Control, Control Control Control.

Can’t roll! Can’t roll! Cantroll! Control!

Hodor!

Control the full Control…

Thanks for the memories

The Orville crew opens a 400-year-old time capsule that was sealed in 2015 in Saratoga Springs, New York, and among the preserved relics is a smartphone, left behind — with all personal data intact — by a young woman. Once reviving the phone and powering it up, the crew discovers a treasure trove documenting a short period of a long-ago life.

“Lasting Impressions” is the sort of story that could likely be sold with a single-sentence pitch (which is the very definition of “high concept,” even though this story does not at all play like one), simply because of how many possibilities the premise opens up. This could’ve gone in any number of directions, documenting any number of fictional lives. That it picks the mundane details of a would-be romance is a testament to the writers’ faith in the concept.

Read the full review…

A plan to capture the Red Angel brings back the crazy

I’ll say this: Discovery is almost never boring. Even when it’s batshit-crazy bonkers, it’s pretty exciting.

Consider “The Red Angel,” which is equal parts respectable and loony, measured and overwrought, exposition-filled and visceral, and either benefits or suffers from numerous WTF moments — I’m not sure which. It advances the season arc by answering questions that raise more questions. It has substantial character work, but nearly all of it surrounds a single character. Guess which one. This is entertaining, but I can’t call it good. It’s a sci-fi potboiler.

Read the full review…

▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2019 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.